Doctors Also Feel Their Clients’ Discomfort.

Dr AB had been working for unbroken 30 hours. He was rostered to be on duty for two consecutive days without a break to go home to refresh. The time was 2:00 pm; he was about to hand over to the next group of doctors when a bus brought in eight patients with multiple degrees of injuries. He had called his wife that he was about to leave work when the news broke out at the emergency room of the hospital about the arrival of the accident victims. He stayed back for another 8 hours to support the doctors on duty. There was no incentive for his extra work. He got home to meet an angry wife…

Many times, doctors have been given several labels; some complimentary, others derogatory. A few derogatory ones describe the doctors as being, “money conscious,” ‘insensitive,’ ‘unemotional,’ or even ‘wicked.’

In reaction to the above, firstly, most people had formed their personalities before studying medicine. Most medical students are adults or in the late adolescent years meaning that they are responsible for their decisions irrespective of what they are being taught in school or the non-academic environments.

Most persons who endure the sacrifice of practising the medical profession definitely have made some resolutions including delaying gratification, keeping vigil to ensure others are well, getting paid incommensurately for work done, et cetera.

In countries with poor systems, work ethics has become a thing of conscience or goodwill; no checks, no timely sanctions, no incentives. In these settings, the doctor’s style of practice is therefore influenced by his or her belief system – family orientation, social exposure, and religion or spirituality. In developed countries, it doesn’t matter if you are a genuine Christian, Moslem, or Pagan; so long you have sworn to practice medicine, there is a minimum expectation of work ethics or standard of practice below which you must not be found culpable.

Irrespective of people’s opinion of what kind of person a doctor is, the doctor feels the client’s discomfort.

To call a patient or client in order to find out about his or her wellbeing…

To go back to one’s books and read over and over again searching for clues to the treatment of a patient’s complaint…

To keep vigil because a patient’s blood pressure or blood sugar is alarmingly high…

To accept a meagre fee in return for a comprehensive service given to clients while one’s family is left unattended to…

To accept and treat a patient who may infect you with his or her disease…

To be verbally or physically abused by dissatisfied clients sometimes…

Definitely, doctors feel the discomfort of their clients also.

 

Live and let live.

Post Author: Dr Ademola Orolu

Dr Ademola Orolu is a Consultant Family Physician. He holds the Fellowship of The West African College of Physicians. He is also an Associate Fellow of The National Postgraduate Medical College of Nigeria. He is in active clinical practice. He is a writer, a patient advocate, and has a passion for health education. He is the Medical Director/Chief Executive Officer of Nathaniel Health Consulting (a family hospital), Matogun, Ogun State. He is the editor-in-chief of The Family Doctors. He can be contacted via demolaorolu@gmail.com

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